member

Michael J.
Power

Michael J. Power

Mike Power retired from the Procter & Gamble Company in February 2003 after a 31 year career which took him to all parts of the world. Mike was born in West London but he and his family have lived, at various times in that career, in Newcastle, London, Cincinnati, Frankfurt, Paris and Kobe.

While in P&G, Mike had a long career in the Finance function. He is a former Vice-President and International Comptroller of the Company, was Vice-President of Finance in Asia and had broad Finance experience in North America, as well as Eastern, Central and Western Europe. In the latter part of his career, Mike established, and was President of, P&G’s Global Business Services operation and a member of P&G’s Global Leadership Council (GLC).

Mike started working on the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games bid in October 2003, and was the twelfth employee of the team. He was responsible for recruiting the team which put the technical bid together and had overall responsibility for the production of the Applicant Questionnaire, the Candidature file and the IOC Evaluation Commission visit. After bid win, Mike took on the mantle of COO for the Organizing Committee of the 2012 Games, a position from which he retired in 2008.

Mike now supervises Masters students at the London School of Economics, is an occasional lecturer at the Oxford University Business School and is a non-Executive Director of British Swimming, The Recreation and Sport Alliance and Brentford Football Club (Lionel Road). Mike is also an expert adviser on Shared Services to a major consulting group.

Mike has an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from the London School of Economics and holds a Masters degree in Operations Research from the University of Lancaster in the UK. He is a Member of the Institute of Chartered Management Accountants in the United Kingdom and a Member of the British Institute of Management.   

"Fail in the Olympic preparations and history will remember you for all the wrong reasons. Fail in an SSC start up and your company will remember you for ever – though you are unlikely to be there to see it."...Full Article »