Articles

Using Process Mining to Removing Operational Friction in Shared Services

Using Process Mining to Removing Operational Friction in Shared Services

Both Shared Services Organizations (SSOs) and Process Mining (PM) aim at improving performance and compliance of operational processes. The key idea of Shared Services is to share efforts and resources for processes that are common among organizations or departments.

The goal is twofold:

  • Increasing efficiency and reducing costs by avoiding the replication of resources
  • Improving quality and effectiveness by the industrialization of service processes

SSOs aim to provide 'economies of scale', but many of these projects fail because moving the work to a central location may lead to hand-offs, rework, duplication, and ineffective communication. Fortunately, Process Mining can be used to address these problems. To learn more, continue reading the article.

Design Thinking for Customer-Centric Problem Solving

Design Thinking for Customer-Centric Problem Solving

As Shared Services leaders are being held increasingly accountable for business-outcome-based support, the concept of “design thinking" has become more prevalent on senior managers’ agendas.  Design thinking is an approach that has long been applied in product design to generate innovative  products by thoroughly understanding end users’ objectives. Now, it is also being applied to re-designing business services.

At SSO Week North America, earlier this year, one of the sessions introducing the concept of design thinking to leading North American practitioners proved very popular. The idea, as the Canadian Tire Company’s SSO team explained in detailing how user-centric design supported continuous improvement, is to start with the objective and consider whether an alternative to the status quo process might achieve this objective more effectively.

The approach works by identifying a problem statement, positioning preferred outcomes around key stakeholders’ objectives, and clarifying these objectives by reference to stakeholder empathy maps.

View this article to uncover:

  • Why design thinking is important
  • How to apply design thinking to shared services
  • What stands in the way of process design
  • And much more!

Amazon HR: We Like To Test Things Here

Amazon HR: We Like To Test Things Here

In contact centers it’s generally taken as an article of faith that first contact resolution (FCR) yields a better customer experience than requiring multiple contacts. Makes sense. But because Amazon is prone to questioning things, we wanted to see if this was the case for employees contacting our Employee Resource Center (ERC), and particularly to understand how much more satisfied employees were if we resolved their question on the first vs. second or third contact.